Book Review / December 22, 2021
Book Review - The Church as a Culture of Care

The Church as a Culture of Care

Finding Hope in Biblical Community
By: T. Dale Johnson Jr.

Book Review

I agree with the core tenants of the sufficiency of Scripture and the church’s responsibility / ability to care for people’s souls. I even share the concern that Jay Adams and many others have outlined - that the church gave up too much ground to psychology in the first half of the twentieth century. However, I have become increasingly concerned with the biblical counseling movement’s view which claims that the secular has nothing good to offer. This book interweaves this perspective from the biblical counseling movement, and thus it was troubling to me. Clearly there are parts to the secular that are useless to the Christian, but there are also aspects of it that are very helpful as well. Although the minutiae of what part of secular is helpful and what part isn’t is a difficult conversation, the troubling part to this book is that it overwhelmingly and perhaps exclusively values the insights of the biblical counseling movement. This orients people in God’s church against any data / studies that the secular might have to offer.

Also, I was shocked at the brevity of the “case study” at the beginning of chapter one. It was one paragraph. Then, I was shocked again at the swift application of Johnson’s premise to the case study in paragraph two. No effort was put into probing the complexities of the human brokenness of the people in the case study.

I don’t want to be this negative on this book, but it is just where I am at. It has plenty of good content, but the concerns I shared above really overrode it’s good aspects.


Book Review / Dec 22
Book Review - The Church as a Culture of Care

The Church as a Culture of Care

Finding Hope in Biblical Community
By: T. Dale Johnson Jr.

Book Review

I agree with the core tenants of the sufficiency of Scripture and the church’s responsibility / ability to care for people’s souls. I even share the concern that Jay Adams and many others have outlined - that the church gave up too much ground to psychology in the first half of the twentieth century. However, I have become increasingly concerned with the biblical counseling movement’s view which claims that the secular has nothing good to offer. This book interweaves this perspective from the biblical counseling movement, and thus it was troubling to me. Clearly there are parts to the secular that are useless to the Christian, but there are also aspects of it that are very helpful as well. Although the minutiae of what part of secular is helpful and what part isn’t is a difficult conversation, the troubling part to this book is that it overwhelmingly and perhaps exclusively values the insights of the biblical counseling movement. This orients people in God’s church against any data / studies that the secular might have to offer.

Also, I was shocked at the brevity of the “case study” at the beginning of chapter one. It was one paragraph. Then, I was shocked again at the swift application of Johnson’s premise to the case study in paragraph two. No effort was put into probing the complexities of the human brokenness of the people in the case study.

I don’t want to be this negative on this book, but it is just where I am at. It has plenty of good content, but the concerns I shared above really overrode it’s good aspects.


Personal Updates

This is a password protected section available to those who know me in some fashion. If you know me and you do not already have a login, you can request a login here.

Personal Updates
Book Reviews

I am nuts about books. I read on all kinds of topics. I attempt to review each book I read for the sake of my own enrichment as well as conversation starters with others.

My Book Reviews
Pastoral Ministry

God has called me to be a pastor, and occasionally I have some pastoral thoughts I like to share.

Pastoral Posts
The Attic

You never know what you will find in an attic! Usually there is a hodgepodge of things buried under dust.

Explore the Attic
Technology

Most of what is included here are notes to myself. The majority of folks will not find interest in these posts.

Technology Posts